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Cocktail Recipes

Classic Gin Martinis

Martinez

These days, the term “martini” can be used to describe basically anything that goes into a stemmed glass. While I’m not here to correct a whole group of the population on what they want to call a certain drink, a classic martini is much more simple and straightforward than some of the bright concoctions bearing the name today.

For the purposes of working in the cocktail bar, I usually contain my definition of a martini as any spirit (but usually gin) combined with an aromatized wine and some bitters, stirred over ice and served up in a coupe. Why stirred? Because there are no heavy syrups or citrus acids in the style of martini, I don’t need to dilute my drink as much when I’m chilling it. Shaking dilutes a cocktail much quicker than stirred, so to avoid ending up with a watery martini, I always stir these boozy versions (Sorry 007).

Classic Gin Martini

2 oz gin

3/4 oz dry vermouth

3 dash orange bitters

1/4 bar spoon rich simple syrup (2:1)

  1. Combine all ingredients in a cocktail mixing glass with ice.
  2. Stir well until cold, about 30 seconds.
  3. Strain into a stemmed glass. Garnish with a lemon peel or an olive.

Martinez

Often thought to be the precursor to the above martini, this version is richer and spicier due to a generous pour of bitters and a dar Italian vermouth. It follows the 1:1 ratio of older styles of martinis, giving it a Manhattan-ish feel.

1 1/2 oz gin

1 1/2 oz sweet vermouth

1/4 oz Luxardo maraschino

Choice:

3 dash orange bitters

3 dash angostura

2 dash of each

orange peel

  1. Combine all ingredients in a cocktail mixing glass with ice.
  2. Stir well until cold, about 30 seconds.
  3. Strain into a stemmed glass. Garnish with a long twist of orange which is then trimmed and twisted so that it falls out of the glass.